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Montford Challenge CrewMoelfre Rowing Club which was established in 2005, received a community facilities grant in 2006 to purchase a Celtic Longboat named Joseph Rodgers. The Club was set up to give local people of all ages the opportunity to participate in water based activities, encouraging healthy lifestyles.

The Club meets throughout the year, usually on Sunday mornings and Tuesday eveningsBwa Du at Traeth Bychan, a sandy beach just south of Moelfre. Red Wharf Bay Sailing and Watersports Club allow us to use their clubhouse and facilities. Activities include a number of coastal rowing day trips where the beautiful coastline and wildlife of Anglesey can be seen from a new perspective. We also take part in race meetings with other rowing clubs and can sometimes be found in local pubs, carrying out 'research'. We are always interested in recruiting new members, whatever their level of ability or ambition. Our focus is on inclusion and friendly support.

With the help of Sports Wales and The Isle of Anglesey Charitable fund, we've recently acquired a coastal double scull and another celtic longboat. These additional boats will help us to introduce more people to our sport!

Môr Wennol

We have a double yole, Môr Wennol, made by Swift Racing.

For racing, Swift Racing Coastal/Offshore boats are FISA certified and have close to the maximum allowed waterline, in order to optimise boat speed, as well as a sturdy ‘rocker’ for excellent surfing potential.

The strong lip joint construction around each boat increases overall durability and stiffness, whilst making the boats easier to carry, and crucially helps to repel water when rowing through waves. Sweep and Sculling riggers are available.

Swift Racing Coastal/Offshore boats are built using sandwich construction with fibreglass cloth and Lantor coremat, with carbon tape reinforcing the areas of highest stress.

All coastal racing boats weigh in right at the FISA minimum weights allowed.

They have a tough gel coat finish, with light grey hulls and a choice of 4 colours for the upper section.

Designed to Perform

As is standard with the FISA design, there is an open transom, for immediate discharge of water inflow, with a minimal area for water to remain in the cockpit.

There is also a lightweight flap at the stern to prevent the inflow of water from a following wave.

All boats feature a lightweight throw line/tow line in a yellow throw-bag, which is in an easy-to-reach position just behind the bow rower, as well as non-slip surfaces for stepping into the boat, for maximum safety.

Ease and convenience – there are handles both at the bow and stern for easy boat carrying, as well as netted areas to hold small items/drinks and buoyancy aids/life-jackets.

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Eirianell

Our new Celtic longboat "Eirianell" was delivered to the club in September 2020. She is so named in honour of the Morris brothers, the polymath champions of the Welsh language who lived just to the north of Moelfre.

There is a celtic cross which was erected in memory of the Morris brothers in September 1910. The cross has been erected on land within the farmstead of Pentre Eirianell, former home to the four brothers who were renowned scholars, historians and surveyors in the early C18.Croes

Lewis Morris
Lewis Morris

Lewis Morris (1701-65) was a poet and scholar; DWB notes that he "by the middle of the 18th cent., was the highest authority on the language, acknowledged as such in Wales and outside it".

Richard Morris (1703-79) was founder of the Cymmrodorion Society.

William Morris (1705-63) was scholar of the Welsh language and botanist.

John Morris (1706-40) was a sailor who died during an attack on Cartagena.

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Joseph Rodgers

Our first Celtic longboat is named in honour of one of the heroes of the tragic wrecking of the steam clipper, the Royal Charter.

Joseph Rodgers (Guzeppi Ruggier) was a Maltese seaman and crewmember of the doomed Royal Charter. When the ship was wrecked off Moelfre in the worst storm in the 19th Century he, in an act of great heroism, was able to reach the shore with a line. Joseph RodgersThis enabled the setting up of a Breeches Buoy/Bosun's Chair and, with the courageous efforts of the locals who formed a human chain in the waves, led to a number of lives being saved.

Of the 376 people aboard the Royal Charter only 18 passengers, 5 of 11 riggers working their passage, and 18 of JR namingthe crew were saved before the line parted (no women or children survived). Without the bravery of Joseph Rodgers, many more lives would surely have been lost. Rather than by drowning, most fatalities were caused by the trauma of being dashed against the rocks and wreckage- despite the risk of the same fate befalling them, Joseph Rodgers and the local villagers braved the breaking seas to try to save the lives of the rest of the crew and passengers.

The shipwreck is also notable for the impetus it gave Captain Robert Fitzroy, Royal Navy, head of the Meteorological Office, to develop the first gale warning service. The data gathered from across the country for the speed and direction of the winds defined a 'perfect cyclone'. The diagram was used to illustrate the Board of Trade Wreck Returns for 1859.

More about Joseph Rodgers can be found on his decendant, Prof Raymond Agius', website (which is the source of these photographs).

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